Ways to Reduce Food Waste

Food Waste-01

We pride ourselves on being a food haven and tourists flock to sample traditional nasi lemak and Indian banana leaf rice but with increased demand comes an increasing waste of food.

We can all follow some simple steps to reduce food waste,  save money and preserve the environment. At Meru Valley  we’re actively trying to reduce our food waste in our restaurant and you can too.

Here are some helpful reminders on how to reduce food waste at home:

  • Refrain from overbuying. Those two-for-one deals are only worth it if you’re able to use up what you buy before it goes bad. Stick to a shopping list.
  • Many fruits and vegetables give off natural gases as they ripen, making other produce spoil faster. Store bananas, apples and tomatoes by themselves. Store fruits and vegetables in different bins.
  • When stocking the fridge or pantry, bring older items to the front and put new foods at the back.
  • Wait to wash berries until you eat them to prevent mould.
  • Freeze, preserve or can extra fruits and vegetables before they go bad.
  • Salvage wilted, sad produce into soups, casseroles, stir fry, sauces, smoothies or baked goods.
  • Reduce portion sizes. You can always go back for more.
  • Learn the differences between expiry dates

(Source: The Star.com April 2017)

 

Helpful reminders:

  • “Best before” indicates the date until which the product will be at its optimum but does not indicate food safety.
  • “Sell-by” dates are an indicator for the store on how long to display the product on store shelves.
  • “Use-by” date is the last date recommended for product use.

Nearly 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and yet according to Solid Waste Management and Public Cleansing Corporation (SW Corp) every day there is an increase of about 4,000 metric tonnes of food being wasted.

On average, some 16 687.5 metric tonnes of food being wasted daily which could feed 12 million individuals three times. Throughout the month of Ramadan last year, the estimated food being wasted nationwide reached 615,000 metric tonnes. And during the same time period Malaysians discarded some 270,000 metric tonnes of  “untouched” food that could still be consumed.

The decaying food turns into leach-ate,  which can then pollute waterways and  other natural water sources. Such waste also creates an economic burden with over- production of farmland, putting a strain on the environment through the use of pesticides and increased water usage.

Try taking some of the simple steps above to better minimise your waste production. Your planet and your wallet will thank you.

Remember you can also pick up your fresh groceries from the Terrace Grocer and Cafe.

We pride ourselves on being a food haven and tourists flock to sample traditional nasi lemak and Indian banana leaf rice but with increased demand comes an increasing waste of food.

We can all follow some simple steps to reduce food waste,  save money and preserve the environment. At Meru Valley  we’re actively trying to reduce our food waste in our restaurant and you can too.

Here are some helpful reminders on how to reduce food waste at home:

  • Refrain from overbuying. Those two-for-one deals are only worth it if you’re able to use up what you buy before it goes bad. Stick to a shopping list.
  • Many fruits and vegetables give off natural gases as they ripen, making other produce spoil faster. Store bananas, apples and tomatoes by themselves. Store fruits and vegetables in different bins.
  • When stocking the fridge or pantry, bring older items to the front and put new foods at the back.
  • Wait to wash berries until you eat them to prevent mould.
  • Freeze, preserve or can extra fruits and vegetables before they go bad.
  • Salvage wilted, sad produce into soups, casseroles, stir fry, sauces, smoothies or baked goods.
  • Reduce portion sizes. You can always go back for more.
  • Learn the differences between expiry dates

(Source: The Star.com April 2017)

 

Helpful reminders:

  • “Best before” indicates the date until which the product will be at its optimum but does not indicate food safety.
  • “Sell-by” dates are an indicator for the store on how long to display the product on store shelves.
  • “Use-by” date is the last date recommended for product use.

Nearly 800 million people worldwide suffer from hunger and yet according to Solid Waste Management and Public Cleansing Corporation (SW Corp) every day there is an increase of about 4,000 metric tonnes of food being wasted.

On average, some 16 687.5 metric tonnes of food being wasted daily which could feed 12 million individuals three times. Throughout the month of Ramadan last year, the estimated food being wasted nationwide reached 615,000 metric tonnes. And during the same time period Malaysians discarded some 270,000 metric tonnes of  “untouched” food that could still be consumed.

The decaying food turns into leach-ate,  which can then pollute waterways and  other natural water sources. Such waste also creates an economic burden with over- production of farmland, putting a strain on the environment through the use of pesticides and increased water usage.

Try taking some of the simple steps above to better minimise your waste production. Your planet and your wallet will thank you.

Remember you can also pick up your fresh groceries from the Terrace Grocer and Cafe.